5 Things We Love by Female Authors

by Treehouse Editors

1. Bodies That Hum by Beth Gylys (Silverfish Review Press, 1999)

“The first chapbook of Beth Gylys sparked my interest, but her first full-length work, Bodies that Hum, really excited me with her formal dexterity (especially the villanelle), as well as free verse, showing me that poetry could be deep, poignant, and entertaining. Gylys, above all others, started me on this path of writing and taking the poetic craft seriously.” — Joanna Davidson, Poetry Editor

2. A Burst of Light: Essays by Audre Lorde (Firebrand Books, 1988)

“‘I make, demand, translate satisfactions out of every ray of sunlight, scrap of bright cloth, beautiful sound, delicious smell that comes my way, out of every sincere smile and good wish. They are discreet bits of ammunition in my arsenal against despair.’–Audre Lorde. To be black, female, and queer, all at once, is to know great despair. But to be black, female, and queer, all at once, is to grow brilliant.” — Bella Hugo, Genre Bender/Brief Encounters Editor

3. Social Studies by Fran Lebowitz (Random House, 1981)

“Women have been accused of being the ‘sensitivity police,’ unable to appreciate or utilize humor without injecting sentimentality or political correctness. Having been expelled from high school for ‘nonspecific surliness,’ unapologetic New Yorker Fran Lebowitz delightfully defies this stereotype. ‘People (a group that in my opinion has always attracted an undue amount of attention),’ she writes in the opening essay from Social Studies, ‘have often been likened to snowflakes…their only similarity to snowflakes resides in their invariable and lamentable tendency to turn, after a few warm days, to slush.'” — Laura Casteel, Managing Editor

4. “Of the Empire,” from Red Bird by Mary Oliver (Beacon Press, 2008)

“As Americans stand face-to-face with the consequences of rabid consumerism, imperialism, and estrangement from nature in the twenty-first century, the timeliness of this poem stings. ‘We will be known as a culture that feared death
and adored power,’ Oliver writes. ‘All the world, in our eyes, they will say, was a
commodity.'”–Laura Casteel, Managing Editor

5. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (Harper Perennial Modern Classics Edition, 2006)

“This novel serves as a compass in my own writing journey, a reminder that the best literature strikes our deepest senses with details as small as the leg of a bee. It also proves the versatility of female writers. We can be sardonic and romantic, critical and sensual–in other words, we’re human.

‘[Janie] was stretched on her back beneath the pear tree soaking in the alto chant of the visiting bees, the gold of the sun and the panting breath of the breeze when the inaudible voice of it all came to her. She saw a dust-bearing bee sink into the sanctum of a bloom; the thousand sister-calyxes arch to meet the love embrace and the ecstatic shiver of the tree from root to tiniest branch creaming in every blossom and frothing with delight. So this was a marriage!'” — Laura Casteel, Managing Editor